Where To Eat in Miami

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I recently traveled to Florida to celebrate my birthday. I checked out a few spots based on recommendations of TV personalities, friends and locals. Here is my round up of faves. Check them out when you’re there.

La Camoronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market
This spot is tucked in Little Havana, which is not exactly a neighborhood that most tourists venture to. I didn’t feel unsafe when I got there, but we did drive through some areas that looked bombed out, abandoned and forgotten. The restaurant is small, but the service is fast and pleasant. Locals know and respect this place with good reason.

DineWithDani recommends: Anything involving shrimp is the reason you go. Period. 

Boteco
Legit, the most Carioca place I’ve ever been in the U.S. I’ve been to Brazilian spots in Atlanta, DC, Los Angeles and New York. It was fantastic. I only wish I had my samba sisters with me. The DJ played all of my faves from Timbalada to Zeca Pagodinho, but the live band hit all the latest and greatest in pagode. We went on Saturday (my actual birthday) which is their weekly feijoada (a dinner centered around black bean stew). The caipirinhas were on point, the food was delicious, the atmosphere was lively and colorful. It was a great time.

DineWithDani recommends: The caipirinhas are perfect.

The Rusty Pelican
This is a classic upscale seafood restaurant. Every Floridian knows, has been or recommends this place. Located on Key Biscayne, it offers a stellar waterfront view of Downtown Miami. And the menu hits all the marks. Oyster, lobsters, fresh fish and delicious sides. This was a surprise dinner for me and it didn’t disappoint. Tip: Sit outside at night and enjoy the view. Its very romantic. The couple across from us couldn’t stop making out. They felt it! You will too.

DineWithDani recommends: The oysters and lobsters are actually not over priced.

Flanigans Seafood Bar
This spot may be the opposite of the Rusty Pelican– a local chain of hole-in-the wall bars serving up seafood classics. One thing I noticed: almost nothing on the menu is fried. But you can get a whole fish with two sides for a very nominal price. You’ll find lots of beers to choose from, a full bar and loads of TVs tuned to sports. This is paradise for my love. Beer, sports, seafood, flip-flop level casual attire and loud music.

DineWithDani recommends: The clam chowder surprised me, as did the shrimp alfredo and smoked fish dip!

Yardbird
First, let me say that I LOVE this place. This southern restaurant in South Beach rivals some of the top spots right here in Atlanta. The server (who was from Atlanta) said they were known for their Chicken & Waffles & Watermelon. Girl, what? I mentally moved past addition of watermelon and we ordered the entree which is meant to be shared. It was perfection. The music was retro. The cocktails were hand crafted and strong. And the guests were a hodgepodge of locals, tourists, celebrities and notables. I sat next to someone from the cast of Empire (who was on a date). That’s all I’m going to say. LOL. The tables are so tight together, however, that I could have eaten off their plates. But instead I talked to the couples on the other side of me about all kinds of shenanigans and we shut the restaurant down with raucous laughter. All in all one of my favorite nights in Miami. I can’t wait to go back.

DineWithDani recommends: Obviously the Chicken & Waffles and & Watermelon are worth ordering, but also the charred okra is a great addition.

Taste of Cuba
On our last day, we went on an adventure looking for something obscure I’d heard about. This worked up an appetite and we thought back to the Cuban spot that looked packed out at 9am. Around 11am we stopped there for an early lunch. This teeny spot in Hallandale serves cuban classics with a smile. And much like the rest of Hallendale: no muss, no fuss. All good in the hood.

DineWithDani recommends: The coffee. I’d never go to starbucks again if I lived near this place.

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Visit the “Vineyard in the City” through June 2016

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by Christopher A. Daniel (@journalistorian)

courtesy in Atlanta Food & Wine Festival
photo by Christopher A. Daniel

A selected group of us foodies, media and influencers were invited out for a glimpse of Atlanta Food and Wine Festival’s (#AFWF16) “Vineyard in the City” the day prior (Jun. 2) to the culinary extravaganza’s official activities. Located directly across the street from the Four Seasons Hotel in Midtown, the four-acre plot is the country’s first ever pop-up vineyard.

The weather couldn’t have been more beautiful…until it started to rain once the event ended. Still, the vineyard’s pastoral landscape is garnished with bushels of sungrown grapes dangling everywhere. In the midst of the grape patches sit a wildfire tupelo, an Athena classic elm tree, a Japanese maple tree and quite a few Silver Date palm trees. On the top of the hill sits a really cool, Keith Haring-inspired mural as part of an “Art in the Vineyard” program.

The groundbreaking vineyard itself has a beautiful, countryside ambiance. As guests made their way down the path leading into the vast green space, everyone sipped on refreshing glasses of chilled Villa Sandi prosecco. The first stop on the tour had thin slices of country ham that cured for the last two years. David Bancroft from Acre Restaurant in Auburn, AL flipped between shaving the rose-colored meat and convincing us to try some ham fat whiskey pickling in a Mason jar.

courtesy of Atlanta Food & Wine Festival
Photo by Christopher A. Daniel

Stepping down a small flight of ascending grassy stairs, Chef Todd Richards from downtown Atlanta’s White Oak Kitchen & Cocktails unveiled some samples from his upcoming eatery (Jun. 15 precisely) located inside of Krog Street Market, Richards’ Southern Fried Chicken. He introduced everyone to his scarlet-hued hot fried chicken and its sibling golden brown classic fried chicken.

Considering I was the first one to sample (which I typically unapologetically am), I was totally blown away by the marriage of seasonings that actually take awhile to set it. It’s a nice mesh of ginger, garlic, curry and onion powder among others that explodes on the tongue upon chewing and swallowing. Adding onto the sensation of the Southern staple is Chef Richards’ bourbon hot sauce. Needless to say, I made countless trips to his table until all of the white meat had disappeared because that sauce was winning!

WP_20160602_14_03_06_Pro (1)
photo by Christopher A. Daniel

Adjacent to Richards’ table sat Chef Gerry Klaskala’s vegetable casserole. At first sight, it appeared to resemble a broccoli casserole. Chewing and tasting was a different story. I appreciated how the casserole totally resembled potatoes-au-gratin, one of my all-time favorite side dishes. However, I couldn’t stop making trips to Richards’ fried chicken table even though I had two servings of Chef Klaskala’s dishes.

Anyhow, the Vineyard is here in Atlanta throughout the month of June. #AFWF16 will host a series of master classes and signature events there. Every Tuesday and Thursday will host arts programming, but it’s quite a nice atmosphere for enjoying a light lunch outside or tranquil enough to enjoy a romantic, brisk walk with that special someone.

Christopher A. Daniel is an Atlanta-based journalist, cultural critic, historian, ethnomusicologist, and public intellectual. His work is primarily published digitally on The Burton Wire, where he is site’s music and pop culture editor. He’s also a frequent contributor to Albumism.com and soulhead.com. His work and passion for diversity and multiculturalism have been recognized by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), and NewsOne.com. Christopher was also awarded a Community Journalism Fellowship for the U.S. Consulate’s Office of Rio de Janeiro, where he traveled to Salvador, Bahia.

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Atlanta Food & Wine Festival Preview 2016

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by Christopher A. Daniel (@journalistorian)

Dominique Love (left) and Elizabeth Feichter (right) photo courtesy of Robin Lori
Dominique Love and Elizabeth Feichter
photo courtesy of Robin Lori

In anticipation of Atlanta Food and Wine Festival (#AFWF16) this coming Jun. 2-5, creators Elizabeth Feichter and Dominique Love recently hosted an intimate preview at their lofty headquarters in West Midtown.

The intimate lunch, titled “BBQ & Sound Bites,” gave a few of us foodies and cuisine enthusiasts a glimpse into the four- day, sixth annual epicurean extravaganza that celebrates the tasty, mouth-watering dishes and specialty cocktails from below the Mason-Dixon Line. Our meal was originally set to take place in Piedmont Park’s secluded, immensely green and flat Promenade area, where the festival has migrated to from its original Midtown location sandwiched between 12th and 13th Streets.

We’ve run out of space in Midtown unfortunately,” warns a sanguine Feichter. “We try to stay urban, leaving everything within walking distance. This space allows us to be a little more private. It’s a beautiful space.”

Unfortunately, inclement weather warnings prevented us from experiencing that ambiance. Feichter and Love were still welcoming and buoyant enough to host us all indoors, encouraging us to close our eyes and use our imaginations about dining on the turf. “We wish that this was the park,” Love told us during the presentation. “We were so excited to finally take the event somewhere other than our office.”

photo courtesy of Robin Loro
photo courtesy of Robin Lori

Lunch was quite savory and delectable. We were all seated around a U-shaped table facing both Feichter and Love. The bar area featured a variety of local, bottled craft beers and some refreshing spiked lemonade with moonshine (I lost count after glass number four), fresh basil and blackberries (yum). Fox Bros. BBQ catered an immaculate spread: whipping up some incredible bleu cheese potato salad with bacon, moist roasted turkey sliders on sesame seed buns topped with cheese and arugula (licks fingers) and Frito pies topped with shredded cheddar cheese, red onions and brisket chili.

Feichter and Love, who originally teamed up a decade ago to manage a consulting firm for nonprofit and philanthropic giving, reiterated over two hours how delighted they are about #AFWF16 despite having to revise the event annually. “Each year it is as much a labor as love,” confirms Love. “We’re so excited to share with you the next chapters of this event. We have a big job, to shine an international spotlight on the rich food and beverage traditions of the South.”

Against a back wall adjacent to our tables was a color-coded tile of the festival’s events. Feichter’s and Love’s staff listed and described the variation of tasting experiences, seminars, dinners, brunches, panel discussions, classes and cooking demonstrations taking place. “This is not about Atlanta. This is about the South,” stresses Feichter, “and how do we tell that story in a unique way every single year.”

“We’re a little bit festival but also part conference,” Feichter continues. We’re a lot of things, but we always want to find a way to push the festival forward.” Feichter and Love initially formed #AFWF16 after traveling to the Food and Wine Classic in Aspen and immediately noticing the foodie culture’s excitement and sense of community.

This year, Friday’s events will begin later in the day. Classes will primarily take place between Friday and Saturday, so that there is more focus on Sunday’s brunch. #AFWF16 is also making history, hosting the country’s very first pop-up vineyard. The vineyard will also premiere various arts events from Jun. 1-30, performances every Tuesdays and Thursdays.

photo courtesy of Robin Lori
photo courtesy of Robin Lori

Additionally, subsequent themes to be discussed throughout #AFWF16 include ingredients, poor man’s food, immigrant influences, vegetables, state-to-state traditions (or “road trips”) and tequila v. bourbon. The challenge every year Feichter and Love face is ensuring the talent in attendance can expose everyone to something new.

The ladies even encouraged us to be the “megaphone” for sharing our stories and experiences about the annual affair. “Food of place is important to defining who we are as people and as a group,” stresses Love.

“Doing this is telling the story of what’s going on in the South, and what’s going on is really tasty. It’s really exciting. It’s really innovative. It’s really something special to so many of us, and we want Atlanta to be the host and gateway for this.”

 

Christopher A. Daniel is an Atlanta-based journalist, cultural critic, historian, ethnomusicologist, and public intellectual. His work is primarily published digitally on The Burton Wire, where he is site’s music and pop culture editor. He’s also a frequent contributor to Albumism.com and soulhead.com. His work and passion for diversity and multiculturalism have been recognized by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), and NewsOne.com. Christopher was also awarded a Community Journalism Fellowship for the U.S. Consulate’s Office of Rio de Janeiro, where he traveled to Salvador, Bahia.

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High-Tech Hacks for a Tiny Kitchen… tools, tips and apps

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Cooking demonstrations are slow to come, mostly because I have such a teeny kitchen. If you’re like me, perhaps you can benefit from these few high-tech kitchen hacks!

High Tech Kitchen Hacks
For more detail, click below…

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Kevin Rathbun Steak… Surprisingly Vegetarian Friendly

Kevin Rathbun's Steak Cocktails
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My “vegetablerian” friend got a group of her favorite foodies together, myself included, for an indulgent girls night out. We decided to visit Kevin Rathbun Steak located in the Atlanta neighborhood Inman Park near the Krog Street Market– right on the belt line.

The restaurant was packed on this Saturday night. We added one person to our reservation at the last minute, which resulted in a bit of a wait. So we grabbed seats outside by the fireplace, ordered a few appetizers and a round of cocktails. Literally EVERYTHING was delicious– including the server J/K. The Grilled “Thick-Cut” Bacon is the perfect blend of sweet and salty and savory thanks to the sriracha-molasses glaze. And for me this appetizer is just one example of what sets Kevin Rathbun Steak apart from other steakhouses in the city.

Kevin Rathbun Steak is obviously known for meat, specifically the aged steaks. I had no doubt that this portion of the meal would be amazing. I was however concerned about the sides. That is typically where steakhouses fall off for me. As is common, the sides are ala cart– meaning the meat doesn’t come with a side. You order them separately and they are generally large enough to share. This group had already agreed to share the sides so that we could try everything.

With a vegetarian in the group, I assumed that we’d have to be judicious with what we ordered. I was shocked to see that the vast majority of the sides were actually vegetarian. I was also surprised to see that it didn’t just consist of generic options like asparagus and potatoes. There are 15 side dishes to choose from. The stand outs for me where the Kale laced with agave, the macaroni with truffle crumbles and the butternut squash risotto.

Final Word: Two thumbs up. Great atmosphere, great service, great drinks, great food. Kevin Rathbun’s Steak is not a boring steakhouse. You won’t find food like this at your neighborhood chain restaurants.

TIPS: (1) Make a reservation– especially on the weekends. I returned on a Tuesday and it was still packed. (2) Follow the crowds. Apple maps will send you to a house on the next street over and announce “arrived!” (3) Feel free to bring your favorite wine; the corking fee is only $20.

 

Kevin Rathbun Steak Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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Champagne… How to Choose Your Next Bottle of Bubbly

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I love champagne! I don’t indulge nearly as much as I would like. I’d wake up to champagne if I could, but real life. And also, maybe you can relate, I’m overwhelmed by options. The info graphic below (from the Aria Resort and Casino in Vegas) might be helpful.

Champagne Guide Infographic

Below, click MORE for more details about champagne pairings.
“Pleasure without Champagne is purely artificial.” – Oscar Wilde

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Portico Global Cuisine– Basic Menu, but Good Food

Valentine's Day Surf N Turf
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I recently dined at Portico Global Cuisine, which is located at the Le Meriden Hotel Perimeter Atlanta, near Perimeter Mall. Over the years, this particular hotel location has been the Westin, the W Perimeter and a few years ago it got a complete overhaul as the Le Meridien.

The Le Meridien present itself as design centric, contemporary hotel with a focus on the customer experience. Entering the lobby, you immediately get that sense with the clean lines of the design esthetic, the contemporary earthy textures, warm fabrics and of course the friendly staff. I hoped that Portico would deliver in the same vein.

As it was Valentine’s Day, there was a prix fixe menu that featured a few clichés but I can’t complain because I totally took the bait and ordered the Surf N Turf. I needed a lobster tail in my life that night. It was served with truffle cream, asparagus and mashed potatoes.

My love ordered from the regular menu which disappointingly featured a host of generic staples like a salmon dish, a pork chop, a burger and a market fish. He ordered the ribeye, which was served with asparagus and a mushroom risotto. The menu options didn’t thrill me, but again, I hoped that they would deliver in execution.

As the food goes, nothing was amiss. I have to say, for all my disappointment at the uninspiring options on the menu—my steak was nothing short of fantastic. It was cooked perfectly. The lobster tail was huge and tender. The potatoes were clearly prepared with heavy cream. And the truffle cream sauce for my steak was to die for–I nearly cried.

It’s noon somewhere… J/k these were our drinks from Valentine’s dinner. Super delish! @eddie_shoryuken loved his Manhattan. #drinks #bar #love #foodie #datenight #dinner #drink #vodka #instagood #happyhour #drinks #alcohol #drinkup #cocktails #cocktailhour #classiccocktails #atlanta #atl

“It’s noon somewhere… J/k these were our drinks from Valentine’s dinner. Super delish! @eddie_shoryuken loved his Manhattan. #drinks #bar #love #foodie…”

Let’s talk about the drinks. After flipping the wine menu over a few times I realized there were no cocktails. When I asked about that, the server presented me with a separate menu that no other table seemed to have.

The conversation of ordering cocktails brings me to the bar service. Portico has a small dining room. There is also an outdoor space which I hope to experience this summer, but it too is very small. The bar for the restaurant is technically the lobby bar called, Longitude 84. So if you ever have to wait for a table, you’ll be hanging out at the lobby bar until they call you.

For Valentine’s Day, the restaurant was prepared for the high volume with many servers and I imagine a full kitchen. So seating went quickly, food came in a timely fashion, but the drinks did not—as Longitude 84 serves not only the lobby, but the restaurant and the guest rooms. So on high volume nights, be prepared for a wait on drinks unless you order at the bar before checking in with the restaurant hostess.

My final thoughts: Having tried a few salads, a soup, a few steaks and a few cocktails at Portico– I have to give it a thumbs up. I say if you live in the area and haven’t tried it—stop in on your next date night or girls’ night. Portico doesn’t cater to a jeans and t-shirt crowd. I remember one couple coming in dressed that way and everyone in the dining room looked at them sideways. You don’t have to be in a suit, but I believe in matching the restaurant’s aesthetic.

My only critique is the menu. The food is prepared well, but the name of the restaurant is Portico GLOBAL Cuisine and I was completely underwhelmed with the options. I hope that they will revisit the menu before I return in the summer to hang out in the outdoor space.

Portico Global Cuisine Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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Eat Your Way to a Prosperous New Year

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Champagne goes with everything!
Champagne goes with everything!

Growing up, my family got together every January 1st for lunch or dinner. It was always the same meal, but I really never realized that pattern. One year, I heard someone say “I gotta get some more collard greens, I need all the money I can get!” This confused me, so of course I asked my mom what that meant and she explained it all to me.

 

It is a tradition in some cultures to eat a specific meal on New Years Eve or New Years Day. In Span and many latin american countries, they eat 12 grapes at midnight. In Pakistan and India people eat rice to symbolize prosperity. There are even behavior traditions, like packing a suitcase to encourage travel in the new year. Other people believe the first person to cross the home’s threshold will be the most lucky. And in my family, we make sure that we have a very clean house by midnight.

 

As for food, our tradition is fairly simple. We eat black eyed peas, collard greens, candied sweet potatoes and ham. The black eyed peas and ham are for good luck. The collards represent financial gain. But I have no idea why we always have candied sweet potatoes. There are other foods around too, but those four are the main staples.

 

Even some restaurants get in on this game. One year a lot of my relatives were traveling, so my mom, my aunt, my cousin and I went out for lunch. In honor of the new year, South City Kitchen was serving a black eyed pea and collard green soup as a special starter. We all indulged. It was fantastic.

 

Anyway, I wish all of you a very happy new year. If you’re even a little bit superstitious, be sure to eat some good luck foods! The list below could be a good place to start. Happy New Year!!

Click for more ideas for good luck meals on New Years Eve and New Years Day!

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The Bitter Truth about Bitters

The Bitter Truth Cocktail Bitters Traveler's Set
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The Bitter Truth Cocktail Bitters Traveler's Set
The Bitter Truth Cocktail Bitters Traveler’s Set

I have to admit that for years I had no idea what “bitters” were. I would see the word in cocktail ingredients list and shrug it off. 

I also didn’t know that there were so many different types of bitters. I only ever saw angostura bitters and orange bitters on the shelf at the grocery store. So you can imagine my surprise when I started talking to mixologists about why they used bitters in drinks. 

So for those of you who don’t know:

What are bitters? Bitters are literally liquid extracts of herbs, seeds, barks, roots, rinds, flowers and leaves. .

What do bitters do? Bitters were historically used by apothecaries to aid in digestion among other things. Today they are used to add very specific flavors and to add amazing smells that bringing out mild, unique flavors in your cocktails.

Can I use bitters at home? If you want to upgrade your home bar, you should absolutely include at least two different types of bitters. You’ll seriously really impress your friends with your extensive home bar if you include these key ingredients.

Where do I start? Purchase The Bitter Truth Traveler. This set includes five different flavor bitters in a cool box. As an added bonus, this set is TSA regulation for in-flight carry-on bags! And from my personal experience, since you only need a few dashes per drink, this kit will last you a long time! 

For more information about the kit click here. And click below for cocktail recipes for the bitters!

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Thanksgiving Prep… Never Feel Overwhelmed Again!

"The Turkey" by Antony Quintano (CC)
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"The Turkey" by Antony Quintano (CC)
“The Turkey” by Antony Quintano (CC)

For many home cooks, Thanksgiving dinner is one of the most stressful meals of the year.  This year, however, can be different thanks in part to these 7 Thanksgiving Cooking Hacks from the team at Chef Works, the leading supplier of culinary apparel for chefs and home cooks alike.

 

7 THANKSGIVING COOKING HACKS

1. Create a timeline and master grocery list

Cooking a meal for a lot of people can be quite the challenge. To help make the process easier, you can spread out parts of the meal and cook it throughout the days leading up to it. By the time your Thanksgiving guests arrive, you’ll have everything ready sans the extra stress and clean up.

Start by making yourself a cooking timeline and a master grocery list several days before the big day. Not only will this allow you more time to enjoy your family and friends, but it also gives you wiggle room for mistakes and ensures that you won’t be making last minute grocery trips because you forgot an essential ingredient.

 

2. Prep ahead of time

One of the biggest challenges on Thanksgiving Day is juggling multiple dishes at the same time.  Instead of trying to do everything at once, take a look at your menu and see what can be done ahead of time including:

  • Pie dough. Make your dough far ahead of time and freeze it. That way all you have to do is thaw it in the refrigerator overnight and you have homemade piecrusts to impress everyone the next day.
  • Turkey stock and gravy. You can easily go to the butcher and get all the turkey extras you need (necks, wings, etc.) to make your homemade stock that you will use for stuffing and side dishes and freeze it weeks in advance. The same goes for gravy, which is usually the most stressful part to make with everyone breathing down your neck anyway. Making gravy ahead of time gives you plenty of time to pay complete attention to the process (we all know that stepping away from constantly stirring the gravy can mean disaster) and give you time to strain it so that you don’t have bits of anything in it. Plus, gravy freezes well, so all you have to do is reheat it Thanksgiving day.
  • Casseroles, soups, and roasted vegetables. When creating your menu, consider items that can be done a day or two ahead of time then reheated just prior to the big meal including corn, green bean, and/or sweet potato casseroles; creamy squash or carrot soups; and roasted root vegetables and/or Brussels sprouts.  And if refrigerator space is limited, simply store them in an ice filled cooler until they are ready to be reheated.
  • Prepping vegetables. Cut down on the prep time Thanksgiving Day by chopping all of your vegetables, peeling all of the potatoes, and sauté the stuffing ingredients ahead of time.
  • Add frozen butter to the dough. Adding cold butter to your pastry or biscuit dough rather than melting it or softening it to make it easier to mix in is what makes the end result deliciously soft and flaky. However, “cutting in” cold butter is the ultimate pain. Instead, use a cheese grater to grate frozen butter into your flour.
  • Skip peeling the potatoes. My family doesn’t serve mashed potatoes for Thanksgiving, BUT… One of the most tedious tasks that usually ends up with peels flying all over the kitchen no matter how careful you are, peeling the Thanksgiving potatoes is not necessary. Boil your potatoes with the peels on, then once they’re cooked, “shock” them by dunking them in ice-cold water and the peels will slide right off when you rub your hands over them.

3. Cook your turkey outdoors

We all know how precious stovetop and oven space is before holiday meals.  This year, consider cooking your turkey on the grill or in an industrial fryer (grilled turkey with citrus-herb salt and sage butter here).  Not only does this free up a large amount of room in the oven for side dishes and desserts, the smoky flavor from the grill will be a welcomed surprise for all of your guests. And who doesn’t love fried meats?

 

4. Tape all your recipes to your cabinet doors

Printing out all of your recipes and taping them to your cabinet doors not only gives you a visual of what still need to be done, it’ll save precious minutes as you won’t be searching for recipes online, in cookbooks, and elsewhere. Plus, this makes it easier for others to jump in the kitchen and help.

 

5. Ran out of butter but have heavy cream?

It’s crunch time and you suddenly realize that you’re out of butter.  No need to panic, however, as you can make your own as long as you have a jar, heavy cream and salt. Watch this video to learn how.

 

6. Have your emergency contacts ready

Okay so Thanksgiving is rarely an absolute disaster, but there are definitely moments of panic and second-guessing throughout the day. Have this list of holiday hotlines on hand if you need a quick answer about your Thanksgiving dinner preparations. From turkey preparations to how to store and what to do with leftovers, these hotlines can help you out in a pinch (especially if you’re the stubborn kind who doesn’t like to ask family for help).

 

7. Don’t forget about your slow cooker

Your oven will be getting a workout and you might be panicking about getting all your dishes heated in time for dinner. Slow cookers are an excellent and out-of-the-way cooking option for veggies, mashed potatoes, or cranberries. There are plenty of Thanksgiving recipes for slow cooker casseroles, so don’t let this space-saver go to waste!

 

I you have tips for how to make Thanksgiving dinner prep much easier, send them to me via twitter or facebook! Talk to you soon. Until then remember life is good; eat it up!

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